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Thread: Find the best mic frequency for your area

  1. #1
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    Find the best mic frequency for your area

    I have found what seems to be the easiest to use frequency finder yet.
    http://www.showmywhitespace.com

    Type in the addresses for the places you play at most frequently and note the channels that show green check marks for those locations. Then find a wireless mic with a tuning range that covers those channels.

    A few caveats:

    * The site isn't perfect. It doesn't consider TV signal attenuation from terrain or buildings. In other words, it may indicate that you cannot use certain frequencies in a particular location when in actuality, you can. Better safe than sorry though.

    * The data isn't perfectly current. New transmitters can pop up and create interference on frequencies that the site reports as clear.

    If you need to convert the TV channels to actual frequencies in MHz, choose the "View Full Map" button and you will see frequencies on the left side
    The No-Hype DJ:
    When you can't afford the best...
    I'm one of the rest.

  2. #2
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    There isn't many open channels in my area. Three to be exact and only one is past channel 20

  3. #3
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    What are the "forbidden" frequencies for wireless mics again?

  4. #4
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    I think you are referring to the 700 MHz band (698-806 MHz). This band will have new occupants soon that could step all over your mics. Existing wireless mics in that band may soon lose their FCC type certification.
    The No-Hype DJ:
    When you can't afford the best...
    I'm one of the rest.

  5. #5
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    Sawdust,

    My list came up with (2) channels that were marked as Mic Channels. They were channels 36 (602-608) and 40 (626-632). Does this mean that these have been reserved specifically for us entertainers in my area?
    -Victor

  6. #6
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    Not really. It means that when TV Band devices (formerly known as white space devices) are introduced, they will not use those channels.
    The No-Hype DJ:
    When you can't afford the best...
    I'm one of the rest.

  7. #7
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    So are those Mic Channels a better bet or worse bet for our usage?
    -Victor

  8. #8
    Just to clarify, has the 700mhz band fiasco started yet?? I'm in the DC area. Is it illegal NOW for me to be using a mic in this frequency range?

  9. #9
    Yes, it is illegal to use mics in the frequencies that are now licensed frequencies for other devices. However, if nobody is using it in your area yet, chances are, nobody will complain.

  10. #10
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    bjojade,

    I haven't read the FCC votes for several months. Last I knew they still hadn't removed type certification for the 700 MHz mics. It was still in a pending status. Do you know when the vote took place?
    The No-Hype DJ:
    When you can't afford the best...
    I'm one of the rest.

  11. #11
    I went to that web link not bad but I use a Shure SLX with 1400Ch. to choose from. Take a look at this link you can down load SHURE's work bench and see what channels are available from Shure. http://www.shure.com/ProAudio/Produc...orkbenchdetail
    I found usefull in my line of work. i use it to sell Shure product to customer that don't know what frequency they show be in. It's FREE FROM SHURE!!!
    CESAR MORAN
    PLANET DJ
    (877)-4-DJ-GEAR
    www.planetdj.com

  12. #12
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    I just scanned frequencies for Boston and found that channels 22, 24, 25, 26 & 28 were open. But, we have a TV station "Fox 25" operating in the area. Wouldn't that chew up channel '25' on this list? Or am I missing something?

  13. #13
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    Interesting. I put in the address for Faneuil Hall and ended up with 25, 28, 33, 34, 46, 48 & 50 as free channels.

    The thing the site doesn't let you do is sort by signal level or distance. It makes assumptions for you. The FCC site is more difficult to use but you can sort by transmitter distance or EIRP (radiated power). Channel 25 may have a transmitter outside this website's default search radius.
    The No-Hype DJ:
    When you can't afford the best...
    I'm one of the rest.

  14. #14
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    I used 1 Boylston Street, but the locations are so close that we should get identical results. The other big cities around here are Manchester, NH & Portland, Maine.

    So based on this info, what spread is the best using the AKG WMS450?

    Frequency Ranges
    •Band 1: 650-680 MHz
    •Band 2: 680-710 MHz
    •Band 7: 500-530 MHz
    •Band 8: 570-600 MHz

  15. #15
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    Just plugged in "Kenmore Square, Boston, MA" and found open channels between 21-36. Got similar results for Providence, RI, Manchester, NH & Portland, Maine.

    So it looks like Band 8 is the best. (570-600)

    Another good link: http://www.tech-faq.com/tv-channel-frequencies.shtml

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by chambers View Post
    I just scanned frequencies for Boston and found that channels 22, 24, 25, 26 & 28 were open. But, we have a TV station "Fox 25" operating in the area. Wouldn't that chew up channel '25' on this list? Or am I missing something?
    Fox 25 in Boston actually transmits on digital channel 31. 25 is their virtual channel number.
    Brendan Lafferty
    B-Sharp Entertainment
    Taunton MA
    www.southcoastdj.com

  17. #17
    Question:

    With wireless mikes today being digital, are you able to use multiple mikes on any given single channel?

    Or does this mean only one mike per channel?

    Wouldn't production companies require more than the 3, or 5, or 7 microphones (channels) that are available in each of these areas.

    I don't believe our low level microphone transmissions are serious enough to cause any communications problems to others, it's more of an issue from our side of the matter.

    When you come across a broadcast signal as strong as TV, Radio, or commercial communication on the band your mike reciever picks up, then you are S.O.L. and won't be able to use them.

    I'm waiting for the first report of an issue. As time goes bye and more usage is happening it may, or may not be a real issue for the previous wireless units to continue to be reliable.

    I'm curious about digital encoding that allows hundreds (thousand or more) of seperate transmissions utilizing the same frequency for all information.

    Can layers of multiple transmitted communications occur from different digital sources across the same frequency and not interfere with each other?

    For now I carry my wired hand held Sennheiser and cable, waiting for the day ...
    Video Entertainment - SEE The Difference!

    VJ Johnny C

    (PLEASE: Always consult me before republishing my personal contributions here at DJCHAT)

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by John Christian View Post
    Question:

    With wireless mikes today being digital, are you able to use multiple mikes on any given single channel?

    Or does this mean only one mike per channel?

    Wouldn't production companies require more than the 3, or 5, or 7 microphones (channels) that are available in each of these areas.
    There's a 6 Mhz allocation spread for each TV channel, so you can certainly use multiple microphones within a single TV channelspace.
    Brendan Lafferty
    B-Sharp Entertainment
    Taunton MA
    www.southcoastdj.com

  19. #19
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    Digital does allow one to pack more channels together. The downside is latency (delay) and it becomes an issue in live performances, especially when the singer uses IEMs (In Ear Monitors).

    Digital wireless mics are fairly pricey. Most of the quality ones cost well over $1K. There are companies that make 900 MHz and 2.4GHz digital mics. These use the frequency band shared with cordless home phones and other appliances. Some are better than others but I don't see any touring companies using these.
    The No-Hype DJ:
    When you can't afford the best...
    I'm one of the rest.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by sawdust123 View Post
    Digital wireless mics are fairly pricey. Most of the quality ones cost well over $1K.
    Ahh ... but at least one is under $400
    Don Boomer

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